Frequently Asked Questions



What is HBOT?
What are the benefits of HBOT?
What conditions does HBOT treat?
Are there different types of chambers?
How should patients prepare for treatment?
How is HBOT administered?
How often are treatments given?
Is HBOT safe?
Are there any side effects?
What information does the technician need to know from the patient prior to HBOT?
How are patients referred for treatment?
What is a Bag Chamber?
What is the difference between Traditional HBOT and Bag Chambers?
What is the Comparison of Inspired Oxygen between Traditional HBOT and Bag Chambers?
Is financing available?


What is HBOT?

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is a medical treatment which enhances the body’s natural healing process by inhalation of 100% oxygen in a total body chamber, where atmospheric pressure is increased and controlled. It is used for a wide variety of treatments usually as a part of an overall medical care plan.

Under normal circumstances, oxygen is transported throughout the body only by red blood cells. With HBOT, oxygen is dissolved into all of the body’s fluids, the plasma, the central nervous system fluids, the lymph, and the bone and can be carried to areas where circulation is diminished or blocked. In this way, extra oxygen can reach all of the damaged tissues and the body can support its own healing process. The increased oxygen greatly enhances the ability of white blood cells to kill bacteria, reduces swelling and allows new blood vessels to grow more rapidly into the affected areas. It is a simple, non-invasive and painless treatment.

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What are the benefits of HBOT?

It has long been known that healing many areas of the body cannot take place without appropriate oxygen levels in the tissue. Most illnesses and injuries occur, and often linger, at the cellular or tissue level. In many cases, such as: circulatory problems; non-healing wounds; and strokes, adequate oxygen cannot reach the damaged area and the body’s natural healing ability is unable to function properly. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy provides this extra oxygen naturally and with minimal side effects.

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy improves the quality of life of the patient in many areas when standard medicine is not working. Many conditions such as stroke, cerebral palsy, head injuries, and chronic fatigue have responded favorably to HBOT.

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What conditions does HBOT treat?

Hyperbaric oxygen is used to treat all conditions which benefit from increased tissue oxygen availability, as well as infections where it can be used for its antibiotic properties, either as the primary therapy, or in conjunction with other drugs.

Insurance and Medicare consider the following conditions for HBOT to be covered for payment:

Air or Gas Embolism
Carbon Monoxide Poisoning
Compartment Syndrome/Crush Injury/Other Traumatic Ischemias
Decompression Sickness (Bends)
Diabetic and Selected Wounds
Exceptional Blood Loss (Anemia)
Gas Gangrene
Intracranial Abscess
Necrotizing Soft Tissue Infection
Osteoradionecrosis and Radiation Tissue Damage
Osteomyelitis (Refractory)
Skin Grafts and (Compromised) Flaps
Thermal Burns

The following conditions are off-label which may or may not be covered by insurance or Medicare:

Autism
Cerebral Palsy
Lyme Disease
Migraine
Multiple Sclerosis
Near Drowning
Recovery from Plastic Surgery
Sports Injuries
Stroke
Traumatic Brain Injury

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Are there different types of chambers?

There are basically two types of chambers: monoplace and multiplace.
Monoplace chambers are designed to treat a single person pressurized with 100% oxygen.

Multiplace chambers are designed to hold several people at one time and oxygen is delivered through a mask or a hood.

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How should patients prepare for treatment?

Only clean cotton clothing is allowed in the chamber. No cosmetics, perfumes, hair preparations, deodorants, wigs or jewelry are allowed in the chamber. The technician needs to know if any medications, including non prescription drugs, are being taken by the patient, and patients are advised not to take alcohol or carbonated drinks for four hours prior to treatment. In most cases, patients should give up smoking and any other tobacco products during their treatment period, as they interfere with the body’s ability to transport oxygen.

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How is HBOT administered?

HBOT is administered in a private setting in state-of-the-art, monoplace chamber of clear acrylic. This allows our trained technicians to closely monitor the patient and permits the patient to readily see outside the chamber. Patients are in constant view and communication with the attending technician via an intercom or may watch a movie, listen to music, or just rest.

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How often are treatments given?

The length and frequency of treatments will be individualized for each patient and their condition. For most conditions patients are treated once or twice a day — Monday through Friday — and treatments may last 1 – 2 1/2 hours. Some emergency conditions will require only one or two treatments. In most cases of wound healing support, the effects are gradual and 20 to 40 treatments may be required.

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Is HBOT safe?

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is prescribed by a physician and performed under medical supervision. Although there are minor risks like all medical treatments, overall hyperbaric oxygen therapy is extremely safe. The risks will be discussed with you before you sign your consent form for therapy.

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Are there any side effects?

The most common side effect is barotrauma to the ears and sinuses caused by the change in pressure. To minimize this risk, patients learn techniques to promote adequate clearing of the ears during compression or tubes may be inserted in the ears. Occasionally some patients may experience changes in their vision during their treatment period. These changes are usually minor and temporary. A rare side effect is oxygen toxicity which is caused by administering too much oxygen.

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What information does the technician need to know from the patient prior to HBOT?

If you have any cold or flu symptoms, fever, sinus or nasal congestion, or chest congestion.
If there is a possibility that you may be pregnant.
If there has been a change in any of your medications.
If you have skipped a meal prior to your HBO treatment.
If you are diabetic and did not take your insulin prior to your treatment.
If you have any concerns or anxiety.

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How are patients referred for treatment?

Patients are accepted either by self referral or by physician referral. Patients are evaluated by our staff and treated based on their specific needs.

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What is a Bag Chamber?

A bag chamber, sometimes referred to as soft chamber, mild hyperbaric chamber or Gamow bag, has FDA “510(k)” clearance for marketing only for the treatment of acute mountain sickness (AMS) where at higher elevations there is less oxygen in the air and climbers become ill. Most of these devices are portable and are made from urethane-coated nylon which is sealed with a dual-zipper and design to treat at no greater than 4 psig of pressure (which equals 1.27 ATA or 9 feet of depth).

As an FDA Class II medical device, a licensed physician (MD or DO) prescription is mandatory for any use or purchase of the bag chamber. In addition, most States fire safety compliance is mandated in accordance with the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 99. Some States follow NFPA 101 Life Safety Code which invokes compliance with NFPA 99. This means the local fire marshal can insist that any clinic that uses hyperbaric chambers, including bag chambers, comply with codes which require the installation of fire walls, certified fire doors, sprinklers and other code compliance items.

The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) also mandates that all chambers that can increase pressure over 2 psig are designed to specific fabrication codes and be certified by the Pressure Vessel for Human Occupancy (PVHO-1) and embossed with the PVHO-1 stamp. Most soft chambers have not been able to demonstrate that they comply with any recognized hyperbaric chamber design or fabrication standard.

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What is the difference between Traditional HBOT and Bag Chambers?

The marketing of bag chambers is based on traditional HBOT whereas breathing 100% oxygen while exposed to an increased pressure can correct many serious health problems. However, soft chambers are only designed and approved to use air, not 100% oxygen. The FDA specifically states no enriched air is to be used in bag chambers. However, many end-users of the bag chambers utilize oxygen concentrators with a mask or nasal cannula, to deliver 40% to 95% of oxygen to the patient inside the bag chamber. We do not endorse this practice.

In addition, most bag chambers can only reach 4 psig of pressure (which equals 1.27 ATA or 9 feet of depth). Because of the limited pressure and limited oxygen delivery, an insufficient physiological response occurs, if at all. To provide the proper physiological response, a patient must be inside a traditional or hard shell hyperbaric oxygen chamber that is built and approved to use 100% oxygen and can go to pressures greater than 7.5 psi (which equals 1.51 ATA = 16.88 feet of depth).

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What is the Comparison of Inspired Oxygen between Traditional HBOT and Bag Chambers?

The following Graphs and Charts illustrate the levels of inspired oxygen, the amount of oxygen dissolved in the blood and the amount of oxygen dissolved in the tissue – measured in millimeters of mercury (mmHg). This was calculated utilizing the following variations:

Chambers: Traditional HBOT Chamber and Bag Chamber

Oxygen Concentrations: 40%, 95% and 100%

Oxygen Flows: in Liters per Minute (LPM)

Oxygen (O2) Delivery Devices: Nasal Cannula, Simple Mask and Traditional HBOT Chamber

Environments: Treatment (Tx) depths in atmosphere absolute (ATA)

Note: ProVision Hyperbaric does NOT endorse the use of oxygen in Bag Chambers and does NOT endorse the illegal alteration of Bag Chambers. These practices are a violation of industry standards and are NOT safe and could be life threatening.

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Is financing available?

To increase accessibility of HBOT, ProHBO has entered into agreement with Care credit .One Patient Financing to provide our patients with an option that will allow their desired treatment to fit into a monthly budget.

Known as the Care Credit Fee Plan, it is the latest plan offered by the nations leading provider of patient payment plans for elective healthcare. The application process is fast and confidential and there are no fees to apply.

The plan offers:

Affordable payment options for Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT)
Low monthly payments (A 40-HBOT treatment session can cost as little as $189 per month)
No initial payment required, first payment not due for 6-8 weeks
Low, fixed rates range from 0% – 14.97%
No pre-payment penalty
You choose the terms, from 12 to 60 months

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